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When people refer to “higher education” in this country, they are talking about two systems. One is élite. It’s made up of selective schools that people can apply to—schools like Harvard, and also like U.C. Santa Cruz, Northeastern, Penn State, and Kenyon.

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Seeing what can be done here.

Play Around with It Here

This was my first VoiceThread – something I put together with some video my son took inside his sister’s room several years ago.  Use it like those pads of paper next to the pens for sale at the stationery shop: try everything out just for the fun of it!  Try voice recording.  “Testing 1-2-3” works! Try video recording if your computer has a web cam.  You can also upload an audio recording or phone in a comment.  You can type a comment the old-fashioned way, too.

Just click “Comment” and mouse over your comment choices.  If this is your first VoiceThread comment, you’ll fill in a short, one-time sign-up form without ever leaving this site.  You’ll get a free account instantly with no pressure to buy anything. Have fun!

If you’d like to watch it full-screen on the VoiceThread site, click here.  Your comments will show up on every copy of this VoiceThread no matter where it’s embedded!

Free Audio Commenting

Because you’re here, you’re probably both a writer and an early adopter. Perfect. But like me, you might sometimes look back with a laggard’s eye to a time when the writers’ blogging community was less distracted by microblogging and social networking.

But maybe blogging was missing something all along — conversation. Vocal conversation. Discover how voys.us can get your blog’s audience into the act with free audio and video commenting.

[Audio comments are open! Leave us one at 1.443.6.VOYSUS.]

Soundzine

Soundzine tries to make their ezine look like other ezines, and it even outzenes the ezines in looking like print magazines.  It has a cover.  It has issues – sections, even.  It has a regular staff of readers like a magazine might have a regular staff of columnists or other writers. Guest readers, too, like a magazine’s guest writers.

The poetry’s good, and the readings are generally first rate.

[Audio comments are open!  Leave us one at 1.443.6.VOYSUS.]

70 Voices: Call for Submissions

voys.us is soliciting 70 readings of Rachel Barenblat’s poems in her new book, 70 faces. We seek neither 70 readers nor readings of all of the book’s 67 poems, but we’d like 70 readings, which would include multiple readings of several favorite poems. Pick your favorite! At this point, please feel free to read up to three poems.

Start with the poem’s title. Ignore the slash mark, and read the part of the title in italics. For instance, “Integration / Noah” should be read, “Integration. Noah.”  Do your best with any Hebrew!  After you read the title, say, “Read by [your name].”  If you’d rather give only your first name instead of your full name, that’s fine.

For some good, quick advise on reading poetry as a performance, see Nick Sebastian’s article here. For more information on VoiceThread, the vehicle we’re using here to celebrate 70 faces, click here.

We’ll rearrange the recorded poems later to match the order in which the book presents them. Have fun, and thanks!

Comment by audio, video, or text.  Your free VoiceThread account will give you unlimited comments by audio and text – and a half-hour by video – on this and all other “VoiceThreads.”

Click “comment” and mouse over your comment choices.  If this is your first VoiceThread comment, you’ll fill in a short, one-time sign-up form without ever leaving my site.  You’ll get a free account instantly with no pressure to buy more.  (But if you’d like more – including unlimited video commenting – for free, check out this no-catch offer for poetry and literary bloggers through voys.us.)  Have fun!

If you’d like to watch this VoiceThread full-screen on the VoiceThread site, click here.  Your comments will show up on every copy of this VoiceThread no matter where it’s embedded!

Say It To Get It

The poet Nic Sebastian said something that made me realize something.  I realized that, by saying something, I often realize something.  She put it simpler than that on her blog, Very Like a Whale, last November:

Voice is sense, an organ of investigation, just like fingers, ears, tongue, eyes, nose. Voice brings you information not otherwise available to you.

She later elaborated on voice as “an organ of investigation” on Dave’s Woodrat Podcast this past November:

The value of one’s own voice as an organ of investigation that brings you information, that helps you understand things you don’t understand until you read it out loud.  [Some of the more oblique poems] sound beautiful, but the sense doesn’t come to you the way the words are put together. . . . The poems attract you  but ask you to bring some of your own emotional narrative, ask you to bring some of you to the poem to make sense of it.  I’ve found that the voice is what builds for me  . . . that emotional narrative.

Perhaps the easiest way to make sense of our site’s name — voys.us — is to say it.   (Um, but leave out the “dot.”)  I like to think that most people would need to say it to get it.

[Audio comments are open!  Leave us one at 1.443.6.VOYSUS.]